LeeAnn Hall: Supreme Court Verdict Assures Unions Can Continue to Help Workers

The Alliance for a Just Society released the following statement from Executive Director LeeAnn Hall in response to Tuesday’s 4-4 Supreme Court verdict in the Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association case. The decision lets stand a lower court ruling upholding public sector unions’ ability to collect “fair share” fees to cover the costs of collective bargaining:

“Today’s outcome is an important victory for teachers, public service workers, and the communities that benefit from the services they provide. Public service unions will be able  to continue helping workers come together in collective bargaining to win better pay, benefits, and work environments.

“This challenge to the long-standing precedent supporting fair share fees was sheer nonsense from the beginning. Brought by the rightwing legal shop Center for Individual Rights, the challenge created a bizarre scenario where people who benefit from the union’s bargaining wouldn’t have to pitch in their fair share to support it. It created a ‘free rider’ scenario that defies both basic logic and stated conservative principles.

“Public sector unions have won important gains toward gender and racial equity in the workplace and created avenues to the middle class for people who have been shut out and discriminated against, especially people of color. It’s important for this work to continue – thanks to today’s decision, it can.

“People coming together in their communities and in their unions to express their opinions is how we build a strong democracy that works for all of us.”

Alliance for a Just Society is a national organization that focuses on social, economic and racial justice issues.

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Statement from LeeAnn Hall: Supreme Court Verdict Assures Unions Can Continue to Help Workers

For Immediate Release
March 30, 2016
Contact: Kathy Mulady, communications director
kathy@allianceforajustsociety.org
(206) 992-8787

The Alliance for a Just Society released the following statement from Executive Director LeeAnn Hall in response to Tuesday’s 4-4 Supreme Court verdict in the Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association case. The decision lets stand a lower court ruling upholding public sector unions’ ability to collect “fair share” fees to cover the costs of collective bargaining:

“Today’s outcome is an important victory for teachers, public service workers, and the communities that benefit from the services they provide. Public service unions will be able  to continue helping workers come together in collective bargaining to win better pay, benefits, and work environments.

“This challenge to the long-standing precedent supporting fair share fees was sheer nonsense from the beginning. Brought by the rightwing legal shop Center for Individual Rights, the challenge created a bizarre scenario where people who benefit from the union’s bargaining wouldn’t have to pitch in their fair share to support it. It created a ‘free rider’ scenario that defies both basic logic and stated conservative principles.

“Public sector unions have won important gains toward gender and racial equity in the workplace and created avenues to the middle class for people who have been shut out and discriminated against, especially people of color. It’s important for this work to continue – thanks to today’s decision, it can.

“People coming together in their communities and in their unions to express their opinions is how we build a strong democracy that works for all of us.”

Alliance for a Just Society is a national organization that focuses on social, economic and racial justice issues.
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Debt-Trap Debbie Swimming With the Loan Sharks

Debt-Trap Debbie needs to stop shilling for predatory payday lenders who siphon $8 billion in fees and interest each year from those who can least afford it.

That was the message delivered this week to Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz’s doorstep at the Democratic National Committee, which she chairs, by a hundred grassroots leaders from National People’s Action, Alliance for a Just Society, USAction, and allies.

Decrying the “Sharknado” of debt brought on by the loan shark industry, the leaders arrived with more than 13,000 signatures calling on Wasserman Schultz to stop accepting money from the payday lending industry and stop sponsoring legislation that prioritizes predatory lenders over everyday families.

debt speakerThe grassroots leaders found the doors to Wasserman Schultz’ office building closed to them – so they turned up the heat with chants reminding Wasserman Schultz that they were determined to beat back the shark attack.

While leaders waved signs reading “Sharknado 4, starring Debbie Wasserman Schultz, produced and directed by the payday loan industry,” speakers from throughout the country testified to the devastation they and their communities have suffered.

“Once you’re swept up into the tornado of debt one loan turns into another in a cycle that just doesn’t let up,” said Candice Byrd, a member of Illinois People’s Action who spoke at the event. “It has been a nightmare for my family and me. We need our elected officials to stand with us against these predators, not in their pockets.”

Wasserman Schultz is cozy with the predatory payday lenders, having taken $68,000 in campaign contributions from the industry over the last 10 years.

Aide from Deebies officeNow she’s co-sponsoring legislation that would gut the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s efforts to crack down on these debt predators – and she’s lobbying her colleagues in Congress to sign on as well.

The Los Angeles Times’ David Lazarus calls her bill (H.R. 4018) “a shameless effort by the payday-loan industry, acting through congressional proxies, to avoid federal rules that would require more responsible behavior. The only choice it offers consumers is the ability to keep taking out high-interest loans even if it’s clear they can’t make payments.”

That’s why the leaders chanted even louder as barricades were brought out, then prayed for families devastated by predatory payday lenders – and for Wasserman Schultz, who does the bidding for an industry that charges up to 390 percent in interest rates.

The voices of so many persistent leaders were too powerful to ignore. After at first resisting a meeting, a representative for Wasserman Schultz emerged from behind the doors to accept the petition and a letter to Wasserman Schultz.

The leaders who descended on the Wasserman’s Schultz’s office will continue the fight.

They are determined not only to stop legislation bought by the predatory debt industry but to also win strong rules from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Joining with Stop the Debt Trap Campaign, they will push for a small-dollar credit system that meets the needs of families and communities, and helps build an economy that’s equitable for all.

New Report: Disenfranchised by Debt

For Immediate Release
March 8, 2016
Contact: Kathy Mulady
Communications Director
(206) 992-8787
kathy@allianceforajustsociety.org

Washington D.C. – Poverty isn’t supposed to be a barrier to voting in the United States, at least according to the Constitution.

Yet, more than 50 years after poll taxes were prohibited by the Voting Rights Act of 1965, people with criminal convictions in at least 30 states are still being barred from voting because they are too poor to pay their jail fines and fees.

Disenfranchised by Debt is a new report by the Alliance for a Just Society released today at the Debt Nation conference in Washington, D.C. The report analyzes how millions of people, especially people of color, are blocked from voting because they can’t afford their criminal debts. Meanwhile, former offenders with means are able to quickly regain their voting rights – creating a two-tiered system.

A history of racism in the United States and the growing criminalization of poverty means that African Americans particularly, are more likely to be arrested, convicted, to receive harsher penalties, and are then less likely to regain their right to vote.

“Ending criminal disenfranchisement would be the ideal way to prevent the loss of voting rights due to court debt,” said Libero Della Piana, national organizer and racial justice leader with the Alliance for a Just Society. “Poverty should never be a reason for withholding anyone’s right to vote.”

Some of the recommendations in the report include:

  • Limiting interest rates and fees attached to unpaid LFOs.
  • Ensuring that those with misdemeanor convictions have the right and ability to vote while incarcerated.
  • Automatically registering people with conviction records when they become eligible to vote.

LFO debts grow at every stage of the judicial process, including while in jail or prison. Costs can even include laundry expenses, or haircuts. These debts also accrue interest at rates as high as 12 percent – including while the person is incarcerated. Many prisoners leave jail thousands of dollars in debt, with few job opportunities.

“Legal Financial Obligations prevent ex-offenders from rebuilding a productive life,” said Allyson Fredericksen, senior policy analyst and author of the report. “Many of these issues can be ended by reducing fees and eliminating interest on debt while incarcerated. The ability to pay should never be a criteria for voting.”

Most formerly incarcerated people never regain their right to vote.

“Our research shows that while some states explicitly require the repayment of legal debt before voting rights are restored, many other states are more indirect, requiring the completion of probation or parole – with the payment of fees and fines a condition of completing parole,” said Linnea Lassiter, co-author of Disenfranchised by Debt.

In Maryland, voting rights have recently been restored to to 40,000 people statewide completing probation, and starting March 10 will be restored automatically upon their release from prison.

In Virginia, Gov. Terry McAuliffe is the only person able to restore voting rights to those with felony convictions, per Virginia’s constitution. He announced last year that “outstanding court costs and fees will no longer prohibit an individual from having his or her rights restored.”

This opens up the opportunity to vote to even more returning citizens, many of them African American.

Virginia Organizing leader Eunice Haigler of Fredericksburg, Va., does workshops to help former felons regain their voting rights.

“I don’t know if a lot of people know how valuable it is to African Americans to be able to vote,” said Haigler. “Many African Americans don’t have a lot of hope, so to be able to vote and have a say in your community, to make it better, is a whole new world.”

Alliance for a Just Society is a national organization that focuses on social, economic and racial justice issues.

Disenfranchised by Debt

Washington D.C. – Poverty isn’t supposed to be a barrier to voting in the United States, at least according to the Constitution.

Yet, more than 50 years after poll taxes were prohibited by the Voting Rights Act of 1965, people with criminal convictions in at least 30 states are still being barred from voting even after serving their sentence because they are too poor to pay their jail fines and fees.

Disenfranchised by Debt is a new report by the Alliance for a Just Society released today at the Debt Nation conference in Washington, D.C. The report analyzes how millions of people, especially people of color, are blocked from voting because they can’t afford their criminal debts. Meanwhile, former offenders with means are able to quickly regain their voting rights – creating a two-tiered system.

A history of racism in the United States and the growing criminalization of poverty means that African Americans particularly, are more likely to be arrested, convicted, to receive harsher penalties, and are then less likely to regain their right to vote.

“Ending criminal disenfranchisement would be the ideal way to prevent the loss of voting rights due to court debt,” said Libero Della Piana, national organizer and racial justice leader with the Alliance for a Just Society. “Poverty should never be a reason for withholding anyone’s right to vote.”

Some of the recommendations in the report include:

  • Limiting interest rates and fees attached to unpaid LFOs.
  • Ensuring that those with misdemeanor convictions have the right and ability to vote while incarcerated.
  • Automatically registering people with conviction records when they become eligible to vote.

LFO debts grow at every stage of the judicial process, including while in jail or prison. Costs can even include laundry expenses, or haircuts. These debts also accrue interest at rates as high as 12 percent – including while the person is incarcerated. Many prisoners leave jail thousands of dollars in debt, with few job opportunities.

“Legal Financial Obligations prevent ex-offenders from rebuilding a productive life,” said Allyson Fredericksen, senior policy analyst and author of the report. “Many of these issues can be ended by reducing fees and eliminating interest on debt while incarcerated. The ability to pay should never be a criteria for voting.”

Most formerly incarcerated people never regain their right to vote.

“Our research shows that while some states explicitly require the repayment of legal debt before voting rights are restored, many other states are more indirect, requiring the completion of probation or parole – with the payment of fees and fines a condition of completing parole,” said Linnea Lassiter, co-author of Disenfranchised by Debt.

In Maryland, voting rights have recently been restored to to 40,000 people statewide completing probation, and starting March 10 will be restored automatically upon their release from prison.

In Virginia, Gov. Terry McAuliffe is the only person able to restore voting rights to those with felony convictions, per Virginia’s constitution. He announced last year that “outstanding court costs and fees will no longer prohibit an individual from having his or her rights restored.”

This opens up the opportunity to vote to even more returning citizens, many of them African American.

Virginia Organizing leader Eunice Haigler of Fredericksburg, Va., gives workshops to help former felons regain their voting rights.

“I don’t know if a lot of people know how valuable it is to African Americans to be able to vote,” said Haigler. “Many African Americans don’t have a lot of hope, so to be able to vote and have a say in your community, to make it better, is a whole new world.”

Alliance for a Just Society is a national organization that focuses on social, economic and racial justice issues.